John Morgan & Mary Flynn from County Meath Ireland

John Morgan and Mary Flynn Morgan headstone in Bloomington IL.

John Morgan and Mary Flynn Morgan headstone in Bloomington IL.

John Morgan and Mary Flynn were married in Moynalvey parish County Meath on 2nd March 1824.

I am very lucky to have such an early marriage record for a family member.  John and Mary were the parents of James – 1825, Jane – 1827, Patrick – 1830, William -1834, John – 1838, and Mary – 1840.

The family moved to Bloomington, McLean County, IL.  John died 10 April 1861. Mary lived until 20 Feb 1880.

I found a bio of one of William and Rose’s children, ” At the age of nineteen the father came to the United States with his parents and first settled in Albany, New York.  From there he removed to Bloomington and was for many years a member of the police force of that city.  Because of an injury to one hand resulting in the loss of a finger he was not accepted for active service during the Civil war but entered the secret service.  He had two brothers, however, who were in active service.  In 1875 he came to Nebraska and live for one year in Saline county at the termination of which time he came to York county and bought a relinquishment of one hundred and sixty acres on section 34 West Blue township.  Here he engaged in farming until his death in 1894.”

I am taking time this week to see if I can find any more information about this family.  I did make an exciting discovery a couple of years ago.  When I stopped to get the photo of John and Mary’s headstone.  I discovered another headstone of Mary Morgan Hanley.  I discovered that Mary was also a daughter of John and Mary Morgan.  Mary Morgan’s husband was Edward Hanley who was also from Moynalvey County Meath.  I identified Mary in her brother’s obit. It is exciting to find a new branch of the family tree.

A couple of years ago I found out that they don’t have have any records for people who might have worked in the ‘Secret Service’ during the Civil War!

William and Rose Morgan are buried in Exeter Nebraska.

I am a descendant of William and Rose Morgan’s daughter Anna Morgan who married John Neville.

Looking for Living Descendants of John Neville!

John Neville born 1847 Lynally Glebe, County Offaly, Ireland

John Neville born 1847 Lynally Glebe, County Offaly, Ireland

Have you ever taken time to go back and re-evaluate you genealogy research?  You know more now than when you started your research.

What new tools or resources are now available to use?

I started asking questions about my family about 1962.  Have I made mistakes? Yes, not asking enough questions when I had the chance, but I was only 11 and I didn’t know what genealogy was.  I just knew I wanted to know more about my family.

I have tried to learn as much as I could.  I attend the National Genealogy Society annual Conference.  This is a great place to learn from the best.  What’s new, and how to ‘do it right’. Document what you find!

I am working on a timeline for my Nevill/Neville family.  I am documenting the family in a spreadsheet.

This weekend I attended a reunion with a living male grandson of John Neville born 1847 Lynally Glebe, County Offaly!

John Neville was left behind when his parents – Abraham Neville and Margaret Molloy left Tullamore, traveled to Liverpool to leave for America with two little girls, Mary Ann age 7 and Bridget age 5.  They arrived in New York in April of 1850 with three children – William was born ‘at sea’.

My great-grandfather John Neville finally reunites with his family 14 years later.  I know this using land records I found in Lincoln Nebraska.

John Neville married Anna Morgan in 1882.  John and Anna Neville lived in York County, Nebraska. They had 11 children and 9 survived, and there were 54 grandchildren.

What a special day to get to talk with a grandson of John Neville!  There are not many living descendants left.

A special thank you to Matt Weides for hosting the Neville-Clouse reunion!

Is it time to “Circle the Wagons” with your Genealogy

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The signature of James Nevill of Wigam from 1808! I attended the National Genealogy Society Conference in St. Charles Missouri.  I have been doing genealogy for a long time!  I can still walk away with new ideas!  David Rencher asked, … Continue reading

Can Genealogy be exciting after 40 years?

William Nevil's signature. William was born about 1680 in Ireland.

William Nevil’s signature. William was born about 1680 in Ireland.

2014 has been an amazing year!

When you work on a family for many years you think you have found everything.  I started asking questions about my family in 1962.  My grandmother was Mary Veronica Neville.  She was born in 1893 in York Nebraska and was the daughter of John Neville who was born in Lynally in Feb 1847.  John was left behind with an older brother Joseph Neville when their parents Abraham and Margaret Neville left for America in 1850.

My first trip to Ireland was in 1990 and we visited Tullamore, and that is where I found I had cousins still living west of the castle walls.  I have found this family in Griffiths Valuation, the Tithe Applotment Books and a 1802 Church of Ireland census for Lynally.  Matt Mooney told me the family had moved to Tullamore about 1798 from Mountmellick.

This summer I found a deed for William Nevill of Mountmellick.  The deed identified William as a ‘clothier’ and named his three sons: Henry, William and Joseph.  I discovered that they were Quakers and I visited the Quaker Library in Dublin.  William married Elizabeth Pleadwell in 1792 and after she died he married Anne Atkinson in 1719.  I take Irish genealogy class in Salt Lake City every fall.  I laid out the deed and where I thought my Neville family connected to William Nevill of Mountmellick.

If William married the first time in 1702, he would have to be at least 21 years of age. I know that my William was married twice because he named his parents on both marriage documents!

So now I have a signature of William Nevill of Mountmellick, the son of Henry and Mary Nevill. This is nine generations for me back into Ireland.

Can genealogy be exciting after 40 years? Yes, it can!!

Looking for clues under every “leaf” on the family tree!

A letter written by Elizabeth “Bess” Neville Dec 1959…
Anecdotes
I hope some day to visit a cousin of mine, Margaret Conroy of Tryon, Nebraska and read a diary Grandmother Neville wrote. Margaret says she was born on Handsome Monday, but I rather think it was Hansel Monday (Consult large dictionary) However, she always said she was born in the same year Queen Victoria was. She was reputed to be a lady-in-wating in Queen Victoria’s Court. So you see my grandmother was a ‘Lady’. Someday I hope to know for sure.
The morning my grandparents left Ireland, after Mass the priest, grandmother’s cousin, went to the ship with them when he bid my grandmother good-bye, he removed his cincture (evidently still dressed in cassock and surplice) and said his prayers went with it. I have the cincture in my possession now.
While living in (perhaps) Wisconsin, she promised a neighbor woman to help her during her confinement. To get to her neighbors, she had to walk five miles cross country through a rather foreboding woods. The night before she was to go to the neighbors, she had a severe toothache that nothing would stop. But she couldn’t think of disappointing her neighbor, so she asked for her cousins prayers and rolling up a thread from his cincture put it into her hollow tooth. It stopped aching, and when she died at 87 years of age her teeth were all good but one.
My father, five years old was left in Ireland. An heir to a factory (it was confiscated later) he had to stay in Ireland. At sixteen he came to American, but being away from his family so long he felt never became close to his brothers and sisters.
I do not remember my father. He was killed by a train at Wahoo, Nebraska when I was about two and one-half years old.
The story I enjoy the most was about his big-heartedness. One day an old Confederate soldier came up the road to our home and asked for a bite to eat. My father with this typical Irish graciousness said, “We will not only give you your dinner man, but as you look tired I would have you stay the night.” He, Barney Victory, stayed more than a years. My older brothers and sisters loved him. He later died at the Old Soldiers and Sailors’ Home at Grand Island of a heart attack while reading the obituary of my father’s death in the Wahoo Democrat.

I should rewrite this but I am pressed for time and my arthritic wrist has “twinges in its hinges”.

(I received a copy of a letter on 24 Mar 2007, the letter was written by Aunt Bess who died in 1976 this was sent by Mary Ellen Neville Lepper of Fresno CA. Thank you!)

From my research –

* John Neville was three when he parents left in Jan of 1850.

* Rev. Peter Molloy was the priest from Rahan parish. Peter was born 1830 and died 1883.

* I have not found any factory, but the cousins in Ireland thought John was left to secure their claim to the land in Lynally Glebe, Kings County (Offaly).

* We are looking for Margaret Molloy Neville’s diary.  A cousin in Arizona talked to a distant cousin that recalled reading Margaret’s diary.